amyotrophy
Muscular wasting or atrophy. SYN: amyotrophia. [G. a- priv. + mys, muscle, + trophe, nourishment]
- diabetic a. a type of diabetic neuropathy that primarily affects elderly patients with diabetes mellitus; clinically characterized by unilateral or bilateral anterior thigh pain, weakness, and atrophy; of abrupt or gradual onset and, when bilateral, of simultaneous or sequential onset, and usually asymmetrical; one type of diabetic polyradiculopathy. Sometimes referred to, erroneously, as diabetic femoral neuropathy.
- neuralgic a. a neurological disorder, of unknown cause, characterized by the sudden onset of severe pain, usually about the shoulder and often beginning at night, soon followed by weakness and wasting of various forequarter muscles, particularly shoulder girdle muscles; both sporadic and familial in occurrence with the former much more common; often preceded by some antecedent event, such as an upper respiratory infection, hospitalization, vaccination, or nonspecific trauma; usually attributed to a brachial plexus lesion, because the nerve fibers involved are most often derived from the upper trunk, but actually multiple proximal mononeuropathies. SYN: acute brachial radiculitis, brachial neuritis, brachial plexitis, brachial plexus neuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, shoulder-girdle syndrome.
- progressive spinal a. SYN: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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n.
a progressive loss of muscle bulk associated with weakness of these muscles. It is caused by disease of the nerve that activates the affected muscle. Amyotrophy is a feature of any chronic neuropathy and it may be found in some diabetic patients (see diabetic amyotrophy). A combination of amyotrophy and spasticity may be found in the different forms of motor neurone disease.

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amy·ot·ro·phy (a″mi-otґrə-fe) atrophy of muscle tissue.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Amyotrophy — is progressive wasting of muscle tissues. Muscle pain is also a symptom. It can occur in middle age males with type 2 diabetes. It also occurs with Motor Neuron Disease. ee also* Diabetic amyotrophy * Monomelic amyotrophy * Amyotrophic lateral… …   Wikipedia

  • amyotrophy — n. a progressive loss of muscle bulk associated with weakness of these muscles. It is caused by disease of the motor nerve that activates the affected muscle. Amyotrophy is a feature of any chronic neuropathy and it may be found in some diabetic… …   The new mediacal dictionary

  • amyotrophy — noun progressive wasting of muscle tissues • Syn: ↑amyotrophia • Hypernyms: ↑atrophy, ↑wasting, ↑wasting away * * * amyotrophy Path. (æmɪˈɒtrəfɪ) [mod. f. Gr. ἀ priv. + µῦς, µυ ός muscle + τροϕία nourishment.] …   Useful english dictionary

  • amyotrophy — noun atrophy of muscles …   Wiktionary

  • amyotrophy — n. gradual asymmetrical weakening and degeneration of muscles (Medicine) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • amyotrophy — [ˌamɪ ɒtrəfi] noun Medicine atrophy of muscular tissue. Derivatives amyotrophic adjective Origin C19: from a 1 + Gk mus, muo muscle + Gk trophē nourishment …   English new terms dictionary

  • amyotrophy — amy·ot·ro·phy …   English syllables

  • Hereditary Neuralgic Amyotrophy — Hereditary Neuralgic Amyotropy, alternatively referred to as HNA, is a neuralgic disorder that is characterized by nerve damage and muscle atrophy, preceded by severe pain. It is caused by a mutation to the gene locus 17 q25 of the septin 9 gene …   Wikipedia

  • Monomelic amyotrophy — (also known as MMA, Hirayama s disease, Sobue diease or Juvenile nonprogressive amyotrophy) is an untreatable, focal, motor neuron disease that primarily affects young (15 25 year old) males in India and Japan. MMA is marked by insidious onset of …   Wikipedia

  • Diabetic amyotrophy — Diabetic amyotrophy, a complication of diabetes, is diabetic neuropathy characterized by painful muscle wasting and weakness. It affects the lower limbs and is typically asymmetric. Clinical presentation* proximal muscle wasting and tenderness of …   Wikipedia

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