Addiction
Uncontrollable craving, seeking, and use of a substance such as a drug or alcohol. Dependence is such a point that stopping is very difficult and causes severe physical and mental reactions.
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Habitual psychological and physiologic dependence on a substance or practice that is beyond voluntary control. [L. ad-dico, pp. -dictus, consent, fr. ad- + dico, to say]
- alcohol a. SYN: alcoholism.

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ad·dic·tion ə-'dik-shən n compulsive physiological need for and use of a habit-forming substance (as heroin, nicotine, or alcohol) characterized by tolerance and by well-defined physiological symptoms upon withdrawal broadly persistent compulsive use of a substance known by the user to be physically, psychologically, or socially harmful compare HABITUATION

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n.
a state of dependence produced by the habitual taking of drugs. Strictly speaking, the term implies the state of physical dependence induced by such drugs as morphine, heroin, and alcohol, but it is also used for the state of psychological dependence, produced by drugs such as barbiturates. Treatment is aimed at gradual withdrawal of the drug and eventually total abstention. See also alcoholism, tolerance.

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ad·dic·tion (ə-dikґshən) 1. the state of being given up to some habit or compulsion. 2. strong physiological and psychological dependence on a drug or other psychoactive substance; see drug a.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

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  • addiction — [ adiksjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1979; mot angl., du bas lat. addictus « adonné à » ♦ Anglic. Conduite de dépendance (à une substance, une activité) qui a de graves conséquences sur la santé. « l impact de toute addiction (alcool, drogue, boulimie, sexe) sur …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Addiction — Ad*dic tion, n. [Cf. L. addictio an adjudging.] The state of being addicted; devotion; inclination. His addiction was to courses vain. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • addiction — ad·dic·tion /ə dik shən/ n: compulsive physiological need for a habit forming drug (as heroin) Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. addiction …   Law dictionary

  • addiction — (n.) c.1600, tendency, of habits, pursuits, etc.; 1640s as state of being self addicted, from L. addictionem (nom. addictio) an awarding, a devoting, noun of action from pp. stem of addicere (see ADDICT (Cf. addict)). Earliest sense was less… …   Etymology dictionary

  • addiction — [n] a habit of activity, often injurious bag*, bent, craving, dependence, enslavement, fixation, hang up*, hook, inclination, jones*, kick*, monkey*, monkey on back*, obsession, shot*, sweet tooth*, thing*; concepts 20,316,709 …   New thesaurus

  • addiction — ► NOUN ▪ the fact or condition of being addicted. DERIVATIVES addictive adjective …   English terms dictionary

  • addiction — [ə dik′shən] n. the condition of being addicted (to a habit) or of being an addict; specif., the habitual use of narcotic drugs …   English World dictionary

  • Addiction — Classification internationale des maladies CIM 10 : F1x.2 (Dépendance à la drogue) La dépendance est, au sens phénoménologique, une conduite qui repose sur une envie répétée et irrépressible, en dépit de la motivation et des efforts du sujet pour …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Addiction — For other uses, see Addiction (disambiguation). See also: Substance dependence (drug addiction) and Behavioral addiction. Historically, addiction has been defined as physical and psychological dependence on psychoactive substances (for… …   Wikipedia

  • addiction */ — UK [əˈdɪkʃ(ə)n] / US noun [countable/uncountable] Word forms addiction : singular addiction plural addictions 1) a strong need that someone feels to regularly take an illegal or harmful drug There is a growing problem of drug addiction in our… …   English dictionary

  • addiction — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ alcohol, cocaine, drug, etc. VERB + ADDICTION ▪ become, turn into ▪ A habit can easily become an addiction …   Collocations dictionary

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