hearing aid
An electronic amplifying device designed to bring sound into the ear; it consists of a microphone, amplifier, and receiver. SYN: hearing instrument.
- behind-the-ear h. h. that rests on the medial aspect of the pinna.
- completely in the canal h. (CIC) a h. that fits entirely in the external auditory canal and is not visible at the surface of the body.
- digital h. programmable h. that can be customized to the extent of the user's hearing loss.
- in-the-canal h. h. that is placed in the external auditory canal but is still visible.
- in-the-ear h. h. that fits into the shell of the ear.

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hearing aid -.ād n an electronic device usu. worn by a person for amplifying sound before it reaches the receptor organs

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a device to improve the hearing. Simple passive devices, such as ear trumpets, are now rarely used. An analogue hearing aid consists of a miniature microphone, an amplifier, and a tiny loudspeaker. The aid is powered by a battery and the whole unit is small enough to fit behind or within the ear inconspicuously. If necessary, aids can be built into the frames of spectacles. In a few cases of conductive hearing loss the loudspeaker is replaced by a vibrator that presses on the bone behind the ear and transmits the sound energy through the bones of the skull to the inner ear. Digital hearing aids are in some respects similar to analogue aids but in addition to the microphone, amplifier, and loudspeaker, they have digital-to-analogue converters and a tiny computer built into the casing of the aid. This enables the aid to be programmed to the patient's particular requirements and generally offers improved sound quality. See also bone-anchored hearing aid, cochlear implant, environmental hearing aid, implantable hearing aid.

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a device that amplifies sound to help deaf persons hear, often referring specifically to devices worn on the body. See also assistive listening devices, under device.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • hearing aid — hearing aids N COUNT A hearing aid is a device which people with hearing difficulties wear in their ear to enable them to hear better. Syn: deaf aid …   English dictionary

  • hearing aid — n a small object which fits into or behind your ear to make sounds louder, worn by people who cannot hear well …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • hearing aid — hearing ,aid noun count a small piece of equipment that someone wears in their ear to help them hear …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • hearing aid — ► NOUN ▪ a small amplifying device worn on the ear by a partially deaf person …   English terms dictionary

  • hearing aid — n. a small, battery powered electronic device that amplifies sound waves, worn in or near the ear of a person who is partially deaf …   English World dictionary

  • Hearing aid — Behind the ear aid In the ear aid …   Wikipedia

  • hearing aid — a compact electronic amplifier worn to improve one s hearing, usually placed in or behind the ear. [1920 25] * * * Device that increases the loudness of sounds in the user s ear. Its principal components are a microphone, an amplifier, and an… …   Universalium

  • hearing aid — a device to improve the hearing. Simple passive devices, such as ear trumpets, are now rarely used. An analogue hearing aid consists of a miniature microphone, an amplifier, and a tiny loudspeaker. The aid is powered by a battery and the whole… …   The new mediacal dictionary

  • hearing aid — noun 1. an electronic device that amplifies sound and is worn to compensate for poor hearing • Syn: ↑deaf aid • Hypernyms: ↑electronic device 2. a conical acoustic device formerly used to direct sound to the ear of a hearing impaired person • Syn …   Useful english dictionary

  • hearing aid — UK / US noun [countable] Word forms hearing aid : singular hearing aid plural hearing aid a small piece of equipment that someone wears in their ear to help them to hear …   English dictionary

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