Epizootic
An epidemic outbreak of disease in an animal population, with the implication often that it may extend to humans. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (the CDC) define "epizootic" as "An outbreak or epidemic of disease in animal populations." For example, Rift Valley fever primarily affects livestock and can cause disease in a large number of domestic animals — an "epizootic" — and the presence of an RVF epizootic can lead to an epidemic among humans who are exposed to diseased animals. The word "epizootic" is pronounced ep´i-zo-ot´ik. It has Greek roots: epi- meaning "on" among other things, + zoon, "animal."
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1. Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in an animal population in which the disease occurs with a frequency clearly in excess of the expected frequency in that population during a given time interval. 2. An outbreak (epidemic) of disease in an animal population. [epi- + G. zoon, animal]

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epi·zo·ot·ic .ep-ə-zə-'wät-ik n an outbreak of disease affecting many animals of one kind at the same time also the disease itself
epizootic adj
epi·zo·ot·i·cal·ly -i-k(ə-)lē adv

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epi·zo·ot·ic (ep″ĭ-zo-otґik) 1. attacking many animals in any region at the same time; widely diffused and rapidly spreading. 2. a disease of high morbidity which is only occasionally present in an animal community. Cf. enzootic.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

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  • epizootic — EPIZOÓTIC, Ă, epizootici, ce, adj. Referitor la epizootie. – Din fr. épizootique. Trimis de LauraGellner, 13.09.2007. Sursa: DEX 98  epizoótic adj. m. (sil. zo o ), pl. epizoótici; f. sg. epizoótică, pl …   Dicționar Român

  • Epizootic — ep i*zo*[ o]t ic, n. [PJC] Epizootic Ep i*zo*[ o]t ic, Epizooty Ep i*zo [ o]*ty, n. [F. [ e]pizo[ o]tie.] 1. A disease attacking many animals at the same time; an epizootic disease. [1913 Webster] 2. A murrain; an epidemic influenza among horses …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • epizootic — ep i*zo*[ o]t ic, n. [PJC] Epizootic Ep i*zo*[ o]t ic, Epizooty Ep i*zo [ o]*ty, n. [F. [ e]pizo[ o]tie.] 1. A disease attacking many animals at the same time; an epizootic disease. [1913 Webster] 2. A murrain; an epidemic influenza among horses …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • epizootic — [ep΄izō ät′ik] adj. [Fr épizootique < épizootie (formed by analogy with épidémie: see EPIDEMIC) < EPIZOON] epidemic among animals n. an epizootic disease …   English World dictionary

  • Epizootic — Ep i*zo*[ o]t ic, a. [Cf. F. [ e]pizo[ o]tique.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) Of or pertaining to an epizo[ o]n. [1913 Webster] 2. (Geol.) Containing fossil remains; said of rocks, formations, mountains, and the like. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Epizo[ o]tic… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • epizootic — animal equivalent of EPIDEMIC (Cf. epidemic), 1748, from Fr. épizootique, from épizootie, irregularly formed from Gk. epi (see EPI (Cf. epi )) + zoon (see VITAL (Cf. vital)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • Epizootic — In epizoology, an epizootic (from Greek epi upon + zoion animal) is a disease that appears as new cases in a given animal population, during a given period, at a rate that substantially exceeds what is expected based on recent experience ( i.e. a …   Wikipedia

  • epizootic — 1. noun /ɛpɪ.zəˈwɒtɪk,ɛpɪ.zoʊˈɒtɪk,ɛpɪˈzuːdɪk/ a) An occurrence of a disease or disorder in a population of non human animals at a frequency higher than that expected in a given time period. Compare epidemic. At the same time as an epidemic of… …   Wiktionary

  • epizootic — noun Etymology: French épizootique, from épizootie such an outbreak, from épi (as in épidemie epidemic) + Greek zōiotēs animal nature, from zōē life more at quick Date: 1748 an outbreak of disease affecting many animals of one kind at the same… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • epizootic — epizootically, adv. /ep euh zoh ot ik/, Vet. Med. adj. 1. (of diseases) spreading quickly among animals. n. 2. an epizootic disease. [1740 50; EPI + ZO(O) + OTIC] * * * …   Universalium

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