Euthanasia
The word "euthanasia" comes straight out of the Greek — "eu", goodly or well + "thanatos", death = the good death — and for 18th-century writers in England that was what euthanasia meant, a "good" death, a welcome way to depart quietly and well from life. The most commonly understood meaning of euthanasia today is more than the old dictionary definition of dying well — a good and easy death. It refers, for example, to the situation when a doctor induces the death with a lethal injection, of a patient who is suffering unrelievably and has persistently requested the doctor to do so. Suicide, whether irrational or rational, for unrelated reasons is not euthanasia. Nor is the forced killing of another person. The Netherlands is the only country in the world where euthanasia is openly practiced. It is not specifically allowed by statute, but Dutch law accepts a standard defense from doctors who have adhered to official guidelines. These guidelines hinge on the voluntariness of the request and the unrelievable-ness of the suffering. Euthanasia and assisted suicide are defined by the State Commission on Euthanasia. Euthanasia is the intentional termination of life by somebody other than the person concerned at his or her request. Assisted suicide means intentionally helping a patient to terminate his or her life at his or her request. Under Dutch law euthanasia is the termination of life by a doctor at the express wish of a patient. The request to the doctor must be voluntary, explicit and carefully considered and it must have been made repeatedly. Moreover, the patient's suffering must be unbearable and without any prospect of improvement. Pain relief administered by a Dutch doctor may shorten a patient's life. As is the case in other countries, in this is seen as a normal medical decision in terminal care and not as euthanasia. Euthanasia is a matter of continuing controversy, a tinderbox for debate, an issue on which positions range widely and include enthusiastic advocacy, guarded acceptance, outright rejection, and vehement condemnation, equating euthanasia with murder.
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1. A quiet, painless death. 2. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease intended as an act of mercy. [eu- + G. thanatos, death]

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eu·tha·na·sia .yü-thə-'nā-zh(ē-)ə n the act or practice of killing hopelessly sick or injured individuals (as persons or domestic animals) in a relatively painless way for reasons of mercy also the act or practice of allowing a hopelessly sick or injured patient to die by taking less than complete medical measures to prolong life called also mercy killing

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n.
the act of taking life to relieve suffering. In voluntary euthanasia the sufferer asks for measures to be taken to end his life. This may be accomplished by active steps, usually the administration of a drug, or by passive euthanasia - the deliberate withholding of treatment. In compulsory euthanasia society or a person acting on authority gives instructions to terminate the life of a person, such as an infant, who cannot express his wishes. In no country is compulsory euthanasia legal, but many societies exist to promote the cause of voluntary euthanasia.

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eu·tha·na·sia (u″thə-naґzhə) [eu- + Gr. thanatos death] 1. an easy or painless death. 2. the deliberate ending of the life of a person suffering from an incurable and painful disease.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

Synonyms:

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  • euthanasia — eu·tha·na·sia /ˌyü thə nā zhə/ n: the act or practice of killing or permitting the death of hopelessly sick or injured persons in a relatively painless way for reasons of mercy – called also mercy killing; eu·tha·na·sic / nā zik, sik/ adj Merriam …   Law dictionary

  • EUTHANASIA — EUTHANASIA, term denoting the action of inducing gentle and easy death, first used by the British moral historian W.E.H. Lecky in 1869. Among advocates of this measure to terminate the life of sufferers from incurable or painful disease are many… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Euthanasia — • From Greek eu, well, and thanatos, death, easy, painless death Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Euthanasia     Euthanasia     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Euthanasia — Eu tha*na si*a . [NL., fr. Gr. ?; e y^ well + ? death, ?, ?, to die: cf. F. euthanasie.] 1. An easy death; a mode of dying to be desired. An euthanasia of all thought. Hazlitt. [1913 Webster] The kindest wish of my friends is euthanasia.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • euthanasia — c.1600, from Gk. euthanasia an easy or happy death, from eu good (see EU (Cf. eu )) + thanatos death (see THANATOLOGY (Cf. thanatology)). Sense of legally sanctioned mercy killing is first recorded in English 1869 …   Etymology dictionary

  • euthanasia — euthanasia, active/passive …   Philosophy dictionary

  • euthanasia — [n] mercy killing assisted suicide, putting out of misery*; concept 252 …   New thesaurus

  • euthanasia — ► NOUN ▪ the painless killing of a patient suffering from an incurable disease or in an irreversible coma. ORIGIN from Greek eu well + thanatos death …   English terms dictionary

  • euthanasia — [yo͞o΄thə nā′zhə, yo͞o΄thə nā′zhē ə, yo͞o΄thə nā′zē ə] n. [Gr, painless, happy death < eu (see EU ) + thanatos, death: see DULL] 1. Now Rare an easy and painless death 2. act or practice of causing death painlessly, so as to end suffering:… …   English World dictionary

  • Euthanasia — For mercy killings performed on animals, see Animal euthanasia. Part of a series on …   Wikipedia

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