Humor, aqueous
In medicine, humor refers to a fluid (or semifluid) substance. Thus, the aqueous humor is the fluid normally present in the front and rear chambers of the eye. It is a clear, watery fluid that flows between and nourishes the lens and the cornea; it is secreted by the ciliary processes. The humors were part of an ancient theory that health came from balance between the bodily liquids. These liquids were termed humors. Disease arose when imbalance occurred between the humors. The humors were: {{}}Phlegm (water) Blood Gall (black bile thought to be secreted by the kidneys and spleen) Choler (yellow bile secreted by the liver) This theory (which was variously called the humoral theory, humoralism, and humorism) was devised well before Hippocrates (c.460- c.375 BC). It was not definitively demolished until Rudolf Virchow published his formative book, Cellularpathologie, in 1858 that laid out the cellular basis of pathology. Present day pathology rests on a cellular and molecular foundation. The humors have been dispelled, except for the aqueous humor.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

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  • Aqueous humor — In medicine, humor refers to a fluid (or semifluid) substance. Thus, the aqueous humor is the fluid normally present in the front and rear chambers of the eye. It is a clear, watery fluid that flows between and nourishes the lens and the cornea;… …   Medical dictionary

  • aqueous — Watery; of, like, or containing water. * * * aque·ous ā kwē əs, ak wē adj 1 a) of, relating to, or resembling water <an aqueous vapor> b) made from, with, or by water <an aqueous solution> 2) of or relating to the aqueous humor… …   Medical dictionary

  • Aqueous humor — Humor Hu mor, n. [OE. humour, OF. humor, umor, F. humeur, L. humor, umor, moisture, fluid, fr. humere, umere, to be moist. See {Humid}.] [Written also {humour}.] 1. Moisture, especially, the moisture or fluid of animal bodies, as the chyle, lymph …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Aqueous humor — Aqueous A que*ous, a. [Cf. F. aqueux, L. aquosus, fr. aqua. See {Aqua}, {Aquose}.] 1. Partaking of the nature of water, or abounding with it; watery. [1913 Webster] The aqueous vapor of the air. Tyndall. [1913 Webster] 2. Made from, or by means… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Aqueous — A que*ous, a. [Cf. F. aqueux, L. aquosus, fr. aqua. See {Aqua}, {Aquose}.] 1. Partaking of the nature of water, or abounding with it; watery. [1913 Webster] The aqueous vapor of the air. Tyndall. [1913 Webster] 2. Made from, or by means of, water …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Aqueous extract — Aqueous A que*ous, a. [Cf. F. aqueux, L. aquosus, fr. aqua. See {Aqua}, {Aquose}.] 1. Partaking of the nature of water, or abounding with it; watery. [1913 Webster] The aqueous vapor of the air. Tyndall. [1913 Webster] 2. Made from, or by means… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Aqueous rocks — Aqueous A que*ous, a. [Cf. F. aqueux, L. aquosus, fr. aqua. See {Aqua}, {Aquose}.] 1. Partaking of the nature of water, or abounding with it; watery. [1913 Webster] The aqueous vapor of the air. Tyndall. [1913 Webster] 2. Made from, or by means… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Humor — Hu mor, n. [OE. humour, OF. humor, umor, F. humeur, L. humor, umor, moisture, fluid, fr. humere, umere, to be moist. See {Humid}.] [Written also {humour}.] 1. Moisture, especially, the moisture or fluid of animal bodies, as the chyle, lymph,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • humor — (Brit. humour) ► NOUN 1) the quality of being amusing or comic. 2) a state of mind: her good humor vanished. 3) (also cardinal humor) historical each of four fluids of the body (blood, phlegm, yellow bile or choler, and black bile or melancholy) …   English terms dictionary

  • aqueous humor — n. a watery fluid in the space between the cornea and the lens of the eye: see EYE …   English World dictionary

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