Lateral collateral ligament (LCL) of the knee
The knee joint is surrounded by a joint capsule with ligaments strapping the inside and outside of the joint (collateral ligaments) as well as crossing within the joint (cruciate ligaments). These ligaments provide stability and strength to the knee joint. The lateral collateral ligament of the knee is on the outside of the joint, as indicated here: {{}}The meniscus is a c-shaped cartilage pad between the two joints formed by the femur and tibia. The meniscus acts as a smooth surface for the joint to move on. The knee joint is surrounded by fluid-filled sacs called bursae, which serve as gliding surfaces that reduce friction of the tendons. Below the kneecap, there is a large tendon (patellar tendon) which attaches to the front of the tibia bone. There are large blood vessels passing through the area behind the knee (referred to as the popliteal space). The large muscles of the thigh move the knee. In the front of the thigh the quadriceps muscles extend the knee joint. In the back of the thigh, the hamstring muscles flex the knee. The knee also rotates slightly under guidance of specific muscles of the thigh. The knee functions to allow movement of the leg and is critical to normal walking. The knee flexes (bends) normally to a maximum of 135 degrees and extends (straightens) to 0 degrees. The bursae, or fluid-filled sacs, serve as gliding surfaces for the tendons to reduce the force of friction as these tendons move. The knee is a weight-bearing joint. Each meniscus serves to evenly load the surface during weight- bearing and also adds in disbursing joint fluid for joint lubrication.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

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  • LCL (lateral collateral ligament) of the knee — The knee joint is surrounded by a joint capsule with ligaments strapping the inside and outside of the joint (collateral ligaments) as well as crossing within the joint (cruciate ligaments). These ligaments provide stability and strength to the… …   Medical dictionary

  • lateral collateral ligament — n 1) a ligament that connects the lateral epicondyle of the femur with the lateral side of the head of the fibula and that helps to stabilize the knee by preventing lateral dislocation called also fibular collateral ligament, LCL compare MEDIAL… …   Medical dictionary

  • Ligament — Diagram of the right knee. Typical joint In …   Wikipedia

  • Knee ligaments — Ligaments are strong, elastic bands of tissue that connect bone to bone. They provide strength and stability to the joint. Four ligaments connect the femur (the bone in the thigh) with the tibia (the larger bone in the lower leg): {{}}The medial… …   Medical dictionary

  • LCL — can mean: * Labor Contract Law, a 2008 Chinese law intended to protect workers * Lateral collateral ligament, a ligament found on the outside apect of the knee * Lazaurs Component Library, the Lazarus GUI subsystem, similar to Borland CLX * LCL,… …   Wikipedia

  • Tear of meniscus — Classification and external resources Head of right tibia seen from above, showing menisci and attachments of ligaments ICD 10 Current injury S …   Wikipedia

  • Ligaments, knee — Ligaments are strong, elastic bands of tissue that connect bone to bone. They provide strength and stability to the joint. Four ligaments connect the femur (the bone in the thigh) with the tibia (the larger bone in the lower leg): {{}}The medial… …   Medical dictionary

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