Angle-closure glaucoma
This condition can be acute or chronic. It consists of increased pressure in the front chamber (anterior chamber) of the eye due to sudden (acute) or slowly progressive (chronic) blockage of the normal circulation of fluid within the eye. The block takes place at the angle of the anterior chamber formed by its junction of the cornea with the iris. This angle can be seen by simply looking at someone's eye from the side. Angle-closure glaucoma tends to affect people born with a narrow angle. People of Asian and Eskimo ancestry are at higher risk of developing it. Age and family history are risk factors. It occurs in older women more often than others. When the pupil of the eye is wide open (dilated), the iris is retracted and thickened and it block the canal of Schlemm, a key component of the drainage pathway for fluid within the eye. Blocking the drainage canal of Schlemm sends the pressure within the eye up. With acute angle-closure glaucoma, there is an abrupt increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) due to the buildup of aqueous (fluid) in the eye. The high pressure can damage the optic nerve (the nerve to the eye) and lead to blindness. The elevated pressure is best detected before the appearance of symptoms. That is why when the eyes are dilated in a doctor's office for a refraction, eye pressures are checked. When symptoms of acute angle glaucoma do develop, they include severe eye and facial pain, nausea and vomiting, decreased vision, blurred vision and seeing haloes around light. The eye in a far advanced case of angle closure glaucoma appears red with a steamy (clouded) cornea and a fixed (nonreactive) dilated pupil. Acute angle-closure glaucoma is an emergency because optic nerve damage and vision loss can occur within hours of the onset of the problem. Administering medications to lower the pressure within the eye is done first. In the past, a piece of the iris was then surgically removed in a procedure called an iridectomy to make a hole in the iris and create a channel (other than the canal of Sclemm) to permit the free flow of fluid. Today, a comparable procedure can be done by laser to burn a small hole in the iris to keep the intraocular pressure within normal limits. This condition can be chronic (progressing slowly or occurring persistently) or acute (occurring suddenly). Chronic angle-closure glaucoma, like the more common type of glaucoma (open-angle glaucoma), may cause vision damage without symptoms.

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angle-closure glaucoma n glaucoma in which the drainage channel for the aqueous humor composed of the attachment at the edge of the iris and the junction of the sclera and cornea is blocked by the iris called also closed-angle glaucoma, narrow-angle glaucoma compare open-angle glaucoma

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glaucoma caused by closure of the anterior angle by contact between the iris and the inner surface of the trabecular meshwork; called also closed-angle g., narrow-angle g., and pupillary block g.

Glaucoma. Impairment of outflow of aqueous humor is caused by closure of the anterior angle, with apposition of the iris and trabecular meshwork, in angle-closure glaucoma (A), and by other obstruction in open-angle glaucoma (B).


Medical dictionary. 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • angle-closure glaucoma — noun glaucoma in which the iris blocks the outflow of aqueous humor closed angle glaucoma can cause a rapid buildup of high intraocular pressure that results in permanent visual damage in a couple of days • Syn: ↑acute glaucoma, ↑closed angle… …   Useful english dictionary

  • angle-closure glaucoma — /ang geuhl kloh zheuhr/, Ophthalm. See under glaucoma. * * * …   Universalium

  • Angle-closure glaucoma, acute — Increased pressure in the front chamber (anterior chamber) of the eye due to sudden (acute) blockage of the normal circulation of fluid within the eye. The block takes place at the angle of the anterior chamber formed by its junction of the… …   Medical dictionary

  • Acute angle-closure glaucoma — Increased pressure in the front chamber (anterior chamber) of the eye due to sudden (acute) blockage of the normal circulation of fluid within the eye. The block takes place at the angle of the anterior chamber formed by its junction of the… …   Medical dictionary

  • chronic angle-closure glaucoma — the final stage of angle closure glaucoma, in which there is an irreversible increase in intraocular pressure resulting from progressive damage to the angle structures and from permanent, at least partial closure of the anterior angle by… …   Medical dictionary

  • intermittent angle-closure glaucoma — an intermediate stage of angle closure glaucoma, usually lasting for several months, and characterized by intermittent, transient attacks of glaucoma with rapidly rising intraocular pressure, edematous cornea, and dull or throbbing pain in or… …   Medical dictionary

  • latent angle-closure glaucoma — the earliest stage of angle closure glaucoma; patients may be free of symptoms or have minor attacks of varying severity, duration, and frequency for months or years before a crisis. Gonioscopy reveals narrow angles capable of closure. Called… …   Medical dictionary

  • Glaucoma, angle-closure — Increased pressure in the front chamber (anterior chamber) of the eye due to sudden (acute) or slowly progressive (chronic) blockage of the normal circulation of fluid within the eye. The block takes place at the angle of the anterior chamber… …   Medical dictionary

  • Glaucoma, acute angle-closure — Increased pressure in the front chamber (anterior chamber) of the eye due to sudden (acute) blockage of the normal circulation of fluid within the eye. The block takes place at the angle of the anterior chamber formed by its junction of the… …   Medical dictionary

  • Glaucoma — Classification and external resources Acute angle closure glaucoma of the right eye. Note the mid sized pupil, which was nonreactive to light, and injection of the conjunctiva. ICD 10 …   Wikipedia

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