Marburg disease
A severe form of hemorrhagic fever which affects both humans and non-human primates. Caused by a genetically unique zoonotic (that is, animal-borne) RNA virus of the filovirus family, its recognition led to the creation of this virus family. The four species of Ebola virus are the only other known members of the filovirus family. Marburg virus was first recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever occurred simultaneously in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, Germany and in Belgrade, Yugoslavia (now Serbia). A total of 37 people became ill; they included laboratory workers as well as several medical personnel and family members who had cared for them. The first people infected had been exposed to African green monkeys or their tissues. In Marburg, the monkeys had been imported for research and to prepare polio vaccine. Recorded cases of the disease have appeared in only a few locations. While the 1967 outbreak occurred in Europe, the disease agent had arrived with imported monkeys from Uganda. No other case was recorded until 1975, when a traveler most likely exposed in Zimbabwe became ill in Johannesburg, South Africa – and passed the virus to his travelling companion and a nurse. 1980 saw two other cases, one in Western Kenya not far from the Ugandan source of the monkeys implicated in the 1967 outbreak. This patient’s attending physician in Nairobi became the second case. Another human Marburg infection was recognized in 1987 when a young man who had traveled extensively in Kenya, including western Kenya, became ill and later died. Marburg virus is indigenous to Africa. While the geographic area to which it is native is unknown, this area appears to include at least parts of Uganda and Western Kenya, and perhaps Zimbabwe. As with Ebola virus, the actual animal host for Marburg virus also remains a mystery. Both of the men infected in 1980 in western Kenya had traveled extensively, including making a visit to a cave, in that region. The cave was investigated by placing sentinels animals inside to see if they would become infected, and by taking samples from numerous animals and arthropods trapped during the investigation. The investigation yielded no virus: The sentinel animals remained healthy and no virus isolations from the samples obtained have been reported. Just how the animal host first transmits Marburg virus to humans is unknown. However, as with some other viruses which cause viral hemorrhagic fever, humans who become ill with Marburg hemorrhagic fever may spread the virus to other people. This may happen in several ways. Persons handling infected monkeys who come into direct contact with them or their fluids or cell cultures, have become infected. Spread of the virus between humans has occurred in a setting of close contact, often in a hospital. Droplets of body fluids, or direct contact with persons, equipment, or other objects contaminated with infectious blood or tissues are all highly suspect as sources of disease.

* * *

a virus disease of vervet (green) monkeys transmitted to humans by contact (usually in laboratories) with blood or tissues from an infected animal. It was first described in Marburg, Germany. Symptoms include fever, malaise, severe headache, vomiting, diarrhoea and bleeding from mucous membranes in the mouth and elsewhere. Treatment with antiserum and measures to reduce the bleeding are sometimes effective.

* * *

Marburg virus disease a rare, acute, often fatal type of hemorrhagic fever caused by the Marburg virus; besides fever and hemorrhagic manifestations, it is also characterized by pancreatitis and hepatitis. It occurs most often in central and southern Africa, but attracted attention when laboratory workers in Germany fell ill after handling infected African green monkeys.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Marburg disease — Pathol. a viral disease producing a severe and often fatal illness with fever, rash, diarrhea, vomiting, and gastrointestinal bleeding, transmitted to humans through contact with infected green monkeys. Also called green monkey disease, Marburg… …   Universalium

  • Marburg disease — noun A viral infection characterised by a high fever, encephalitis, diarrhea, vomiting, and severe bleeding from bodily orifices, and which is often fatal. Syn: green monkey disease, Marburg fever, Marburg hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus disease …   Wiktionary

  • Marburg disease — Mar′burg disease n. pat a viral disease producing a severe and often fatal illness with fever, rash, diarrhea, vomiting, and gastrointestinal bleeding, transmitted to humans through contact with infected green monkeys. Also called green monkey… …   From formal English to slang

  • Marburg disease — noun a viral disease of green monkeys caused by the Marburg virus; when transmitted to humans it causes serious or fatal illness • Syn: ↑Marburg hemorrhagic fever, ↑green monkey disease • Hypernyms: ↑hemorrhagic fever, ↑haemorrhagic fever, ↑viral …   Useful english dictionary

  • Marburg disease — green monkey disease a virus disease of vervet (green) monkeys transmitted to humans by contact (usually in laboratories) with blood or tissues from an infected animal. It was first described in Marburg, Germany. Symptoms include fever, malaise,… …   The new mediacal dictionary

  • Marburg disease — noun an acute, often fatal, form of haemorrhagic fever caused by a filovirus (Marburg virus) which normally lives in African monkeys …   English new terms dictionary

  • Marburg disease (hemorrhagic fever) virus — Mar·burg disease (hemorrhagic fever), virus (mahrґboork) [Marburg, Germany, where the disease was first recognized in 1967] see under disease and virus …   Medical dictionary

  • Болезнь Марбурга (Marburg Disease}, Болезнь Зеленых Мартышек (Green Monkey Disease) — вирусное заболевание зеленых мартышек, которое может передаваться человеку во время непосредственного контакта (обычно в лабораториях) с кровью или тканями больного животного. Основными симптомами заболевания являются: лихорадка, общее… …   Медицинские термины

  • Marburg hemorrhagic fever — Marburg disease …   Medical dictionary

  • Marburg multiple sclerosis — Marburg multiple sclerosis, also known as fulminant multiple sclerosis, is considered one of the multiple sclerosis borderline diseases, which is a collection of diseases classified by some as MS variants and by others as different diseases.… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”