Ascariasis
Infection with Ascaris lubricoides, the intestinal roundworm, the most common worm infection in humans. Ascaris eggs are found in the soil. Infection occurs when a person accidently ingests (swallows) infective ascaris eggs. Once in the stomach, larvae (immature worms) hatch from the eggs. The larvae are carried through the lungs then to the throat where they are then swallowed. Once swallowed, they reach the intestines and develop into adult worms. Adult female worms can grow over 12 inches (4.8 cm) in length. Adult male worms are smaller. Adult female worms lay eggs that are then passed in feces; this cycle takes between 2 and 3 months. Adult worms can live 1 to 2 years. Infection occurs worldwide. It is most common in tropical and subtropical areas where sanitation and hygiene are poor. Children are infected more often than adults. In the US, infection is not common and occurs mostly in rural areas of the southeast. Pigs can be infected with ascaris. Occasionally, a pig infection can be spread to humans; this occurs when infective eggs, found in the soil and manure, are ingested. Infection is more likely if pig feces is used as fertilizer in the garden; crops then become contaminated with ascaris eggs. Infection is often silent. But if someone is heavily infected, they may have abdominal pain. While the immature worms migrate through the lungs, they may cough and have difficulty breathing. And if someone has a very heavy worm infection in the intestines, the intestines may become blocked. Chronic ascaris infection can stunt the growth of children. The diagnosis is most commonly made by finding the worm eggs in the stool. Larvae can be identified during the lung migration phase in sputum or gastric aspirate (stomach juice). Adult worms are occasionally passed in the stool or through the mouth or nose. To prevent infection with ascaris: {{}}Avoid contacting soil that may be contaminated with human feces. Do not defecate outdoors. Dispose of diapers properly. Wash hands with soap and water before handling food. When traveling to countries where sanitation and hygiene are poor, avoid water or food that may be contaminated. Wash, peel or cook all raw vegetables and fruits before eating. Ascaris infection is usually treated for 1-3 days with albendazole, mebendazole, or pyrantel pamoate. These drugs are effective and appear to have few side effects. Additional stool exams are done 1 to 2 weeks after therapy; if the infection is still present, treatment is repeated.
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Disease caused by infection with Ascaris or related ascarid nematodes. [G. askaris, an intestinal worm, + -iasis, condition]

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as·ca·ri·a·sis .as-kə-'rī-ə-səs n, pl -a·ses -.sēz infestation with or disease caused by ascarids

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n.
a disease caused by an infestation with the parasitic worm Ascaris. Adult worms in the intestine can cause abdominal pain, vomiting, constipation, diarrhoea, appendicitis, and peritonitis; in large numbers they may cause obstruction of the intestine. The presence of the migrating larvae in the lungs can provoke pneumonia. Ascariasis occurs principally in areas of poor sanitation; it is treated with levamisole.

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as·ca·ri·a·sis (as″kə-riґə-sis) [ascaris + -iasis] 1. infection by the roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides, which is found in the small intestine, causing colicky pains and diarrhea, especially in children. On ingestion, the larvae migrate from the intestine to the lungs, where they cause a pneumonitis, and then to the trachea, esophagus, and intestine, where they mature. If adult worms are present in sufficient number, they may cause intestinal obstruction. 2. infection by any member of the family Ascarididae, usually seen in the intestine, liver, or lungs, .

Medical dictionary. 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Ascariasis — is a human disease caused by the parasitic roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides . Perhaps as many as one quarter of the world s people are infected [cite journal |author=Williams Blangero S, VandeBerg JL, Subedi J, et al |title=Genes on chromosomes 1… …   Wikipedia

  • Ascariasis — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Ascariasis Clasificación y recursos externos Aviso médico …   Wikipedia Español

  • ascariasis — infestación con ascárides, gusanos nematodos parásitos intestinales. Ascaridiasis o ascaridiosis [ICD 10:B77.9] Diccionario ilustrado de Términos Médicos.. Alvaro Galiano. 2010. ascariasis Infección producida por un helminto …   Diccionario médico

  • Ascariasis — As ca*ri a*sis, n. [NL., fr. Gr. ? an intestinal worm.] (Med.) A disease, usually accompanied by colicky pains and diarrhea, caused by the presence of ascarids in the gastrointestinal canal. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ascariasis —   [zu griechisch askarís, askarídos »ein Eingeweidewurm«] die, /...ri asen, Ascaridiasis, Askariasis, Askaridiasis, durch Spulwürmer hervorgerufene Wurmkrankheit …   Universal-Lexikon

  • ascariasis — [as΄kə rī′ə sis] n. pl. ascariases [as΄kə rī′əsēz΄] [ModL: see ASCARID & IASIS] infestation with ascarids or a disease caused by this; esp., infestation of the intestines by a particular roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides) …   English World dictionary

  • ascariasis — /as keuh ruy euh sis/, n. Pathol. infestation with ascarids, esp. Ascaris lumbricoides. [1885 90; < NL; see ASCARID, IASIS] * * * ▪ pathology  infection of humans and other mammals caused by the intestinal roundworm (nematode) Ascaris… …   Universalium

  • ascariasis — n. a disease caused by an infestation with the parasitic worm Ascaris lumbricoides. Adult worms in the intestine can cause abdominal pain, vomiting, constipation, diarrhoea, appendicitis, and peritonitis; in large numbers they may cause… …   The new mediacal dictionary

  • ascariasis — noun (plural ascariases) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1888 infestation with or disease caused by ascarids …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Ascariasis — Spulwurm Weibchen des Spulwurmes (Ascaris lumbricoides) Systematik Stamm: Fadenwürmer (Nematoda) …   Deutsch Wikipedia

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