Skull
The skull is a collection of bones which encase the brain and give form to the head and face. The bones of the skull include the following: the frontal, parietal, occipital, temporal, sphenoid, ethmoid, zygomatic, maxilla, nasal, vomer, palatine, inferior concha, and mandible. The early English word "skulle" came from the Nordic words "skal" and "skul" meaning a bowl. It is also thought that the Nordic toast "Skoal!" came from "skal" since ceremonial drinks were served in a bowl (or skull).
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SYN: cranium. [Early Eng. skulle, a bowl]
- cloverleaf s. cloverleaf s. syndrome.
- maplike s. various defects in the s., especially in the temporal bone, the anterior fossa, and orbits, forming irregular outlines resembling the national boundaries in an atlas.
- natiform s. palpable bony nodules on the surface of the s. in infants with congenital syphilis.
- steeple s., tower s. SYN: oxycephaly.

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skull 'skəl n the skeleton of the head forming a bony case that encloses and protects the brain and chief sense organs and supports the jaws

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n.
the skeleton of the head and face, which is made up of 22 bones. It can be divided into the cranium, which encloses the brain, and the face (including the lower jaw (mandible)). The cranium consists of eight bones. The frontal, parietals (two), occipital, and temporals (two) form the vault of the skull (calvaria) and are made up of two thin layers of compact bone separated by a layer of spongy bone (diploë). The remaining bones of the cranium - the sphenoid and ethmoid - form part of its base. The 14 bones that make up the face are the nasals, lacrimals, inferior nasal conchae, maxillae, zygomatics, and palatines (two of each), the vomer, and the mandible. All the bones of the skull except the mandible are connected to each other by immovable joints (see suture). The skull contains cavities for the eyes (see orbit) and nose (see nasal cavity) and a large opening at its base (foramen magnum) through which the spinal cord passes.

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(skul) the skeleton of the head, including the cranium and the mandible. See illustration.

Lateral view of the skull.


Medical dictionary. 2011.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • skull — less, adj. skull like, adj. /skul/, n. 1. the bony framework of the head, enclosing the brain and supporting the face; the skeleton of the head. 2. the head as the center of knowledge and understanding; mind: to get literature s great ideas… …   Universalium

  • Skull — Skull, n. [OE. skulle, sculle, scolle; akin to Scot. skull, skoll, a bowl, Sw. skalle skull, skal a shell, and E. scale; cf. G. hirnschale, Dan. hierneskal. Cf. {Scale} of a balance.] 1. (Anat.) The skeleton of the head of a vertebrate animal,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • skull — [ skʌl ] noun count ** 1. ) the bones of the head: a sheep s skull fracture your skull: His skull was fractured in the accident. 2. ) INFORMAL a person s head or mind: The sound of the alarm clock pierced his skull. get something into/through… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • skull — ► NOUN 1) a bone framework enclosing the brain of a person or animal. 2) informal a person s head or brain. ● out of one s skull Cf. ↑out of one s skull ● skull and crossbones Cf. ↑skull and crossbones …   English terms dictionary

  • skull — [skul] n. [ME scolle < Scand, as in Swed skulle, skull, akin to SCALE3, SHELL] 1. the entire bony or cartilaginous framework of the head of a vertebrate, enclosing and protecting the brain and sense organs, including the bones of the face and… …   English World dictionary

  • Skull — Skull, n. [See {School} a multitude.] A school, company, or shoal. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] A knavish skull of boys and girls did pelt at him. Warner. [1913 Webster] These fishes enter in great flotes and skulls. Holland. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • skull — [skʌl] n [Date: 1200 1300; Origin: From a Scandinavian language] 1.) the bones of a person s or animal s head 2.) sb can t get it into their (thick) skull spoken someone is unable to understand something very simple ▪ He can t seem to get it into …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • skull — early 13c., probably from O.N. skalli bald head, skull, a general Scandinavian word (Cf. Swedish skulle, Norw. skult), probably related to O.E. scealu husk (see SHELL (Cf. shell)). But early prominence in southwestern texts suggests rather origin …   Etymology dictionary

  • Skull — Skull. См. Гарнисаж. (Источник: «Металлы и сплавы. Справочник.» Под редакцией Ю.П. Солнцева; НПО Профессионал , НПО Мир и семья ; Санкт Петербург, 2003 г.) …   Словарь металлургических терминов

  • Skull — (engl. scull), Doppelruder, s. Riemen; Skuller (sculler), s. Rudersport …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Skull — (engl. scull, spr. ßköll), Riemen, der an jedem Ende ein Blatt hat; Skuller, jemand der mit S.s rudert; auch Bezeichnung eines leichten Bootes, das von einer Person mit S. gehandhabt wird …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

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