Soluble and insoluble fiber
Fiber (the portion of plants that cannot be digested by the human digestive tract) is classified as soluble and insoluble. Oats, beans, dried peas, and legumes are major sources of soluble fiber whereas wheat bran, whole grain products, and vegetables are major sources of insoluble fiber. Fruits, vegetables, and barley are sources of both insoluble and soluble fiber. Soluble fiber and insoluble fiber differ in function. For example, soluble fiber delays the time of transit through the intestine whereas insoluble fiber speeds up intestinal transit. For another example, soluble fiber and decreases the level of cholesterol in the blood whereas insoluble fiber has no effect on serum cholesterol.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

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  • Fiber plants — Fiber Fi ber, Fibre Fi bre,, n. [F. fibre, L. fibra.] 1. One of the delicate, threadlike portions of which the tissues of plants and animals are in part constituted; as, the fiber of flax or of muscle. [1913 Webster] 2. Any fine, slender thread,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • crude fiber — dietary fiber that remains after food is digested with alkali and acid that have destroyed all of the soluble and some of the insoluble fiber; it comprises mainly lignin and cellulose …   Medical dictionary

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  • Nutrition — The Nutrition Facts table indicates the amounts of nutrients which experts recommend to limit or consume in adequate amounts. Nutrition (also called nourishment or aliment) is the provision, to cells and organisms, of the materials necessary (in… …   Wikipedia

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