Tattoo
The permanent insertion of ink or other pigments below the skin using a sharp instrument. Humans have done tattooing for cosmetic and ritual purposes since at least the Neolithic era. In the Western world, tattooing has historically served as a brand of criminality, a sign of shame (like "The Scarlet Letter" of Nathaniel Hawthorne), a tradition dating back at least to the biblical mark of Cain. Note along these lines also the branding of slaves, the tattooing of prisoners of war in ancient Athens, and the marking of the foreheads of French prisoners in the 18th and 19th centuries with letters signifying their punishment. In the Middle Ages tattooing was done of Christian pilgrims in Jerusalem, the tattoo symbolizing the "stigmata of the Lord Jesus." In the Renaissance tattooing was done of astrologic signs to invoke their magical powers. Today the practice of tattooing can be made safer through the use of: {{}}non-reactive pigments; sterile, disposable needles; and sterile work conditions. Without these refinements, inks may cause inflammation, and infection is an ever-present danger. Persons who are prone to keloid scarring should be aware that tattoos can trigger the formation of cosmetically blemishing keloids. Ink lines may also spread or change color over the years, a fact of special concern for those interested in so- called “permanent cosmetics” (tattooed lip color, eyebrows, eyeliner, and the like). Tattooed skin requires some special care. Fresh tattoos should be kept clean, dry, and covered for the first day, and antibiotic ointment should be used for several days to promote healing and prevent infection. Once healed, tattooed skin should be protected with sunscreen from UV rays from the sun (and UV lamps) to prevent fading and skin damage. The word itself comes from the Polynesian markings known as tatu or tatau. These markings were first described by Captain James Cook on his 1769 journey to the South Pacific.
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1. A deliberate decorative implanting or injecting of indelible pigments into the skin or the tinctorial effect of accidental implantation. 2. To produce such an effect. The procedure, historically and geographically widespread, is associated with risks of infection. Removal is difficult, with pulsed laser treatment offering low risks of scarring. [Tahiti, tatu]
- amalgam t. a bluish-black or gray macular lesion of the oral mucous membrane caused by accidental implantation of silver amalgam into the tissue during tooth restoration or extraction.

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tat·too ta-'tü vt to mark or color (the skin) with tattoos
tattoo n, pl tattoos an indelible mark or figure fixed upon the body by insertion of pigment under the skin or by production of scars

Medical dictionary. 2011.

Synonyms:
(to summon soldiers to quarters at night),


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Tattoo — (Tatuaje en inglés), es una marca hecha mediante la inserción de un pigmento bajo la piel. Puede referirse a: Música Tattoo , Sencillo de la banda japonesa 12012. Tattoo álbum de 1973 de Rory Gallagher. Tattoo, canción de The Who del álbum The… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Tattoo — (zu englisch: tattoo, tahitianisch: tatau – Verb: tätowieren, von englisch: [to] tattoo, französisch: tatouer, zu tahitianisch: tatau = „[eintätowiertes] Zeichen“) bzw. Tattoos steht für: das Edinburgh Military Tattoo, ein Militärmusikfestival… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Tattoo — Tat*too , n. [Earlier taptoo, D. taptoe; tap a tap, faucet + toe to, shut (i. e., the taps, or drinking houses, shut from the soldiers).] (Mil.) A beat of drum, or sound of a trumpet or bugle, at night, giving notice to soldiers to retreat, or to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Tattoo — Tat*too , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tattooed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Tattooing}.] [Of Polynesian origin; cf. New Zealand ta to tattoo, tatu puncturation (in Otaheite).] To color, as the flesh, by pricking in coloring matter, so as to form marks or figures… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tattoo — The verb has inflected form tattoos, tattooed, tattooing. It can have as its grammatical object either the design that forms the tattoo (A heart was tattooed on her left arm) or the part of the body on which the design is put (Tattooed his cheek… …   Modern English usage

  • tattoo — Ⅰ. tattoo [1] ► NOUN (pl. tattoos) 1) an evening drum or bugle signal recalling soldiers to their quarters. 2) a military display consisting of music, marching, and exercises. 3) a rhythmic tapping or drumming. ORIGIN from Dutch taptoe! close the …   English terms dictionary

  • Tattoo — Tat*too , n.; pl. {Tattoos}. An indelible mark or figure made by puncturing the skin and introducing some pigment into the punctures; a mode of ornamentation practiced by various barbarous races, both in ancient and modern times, and also by some …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tattoo — /taˈtu, ingl. tæˈtuː/ [vc. ingl. di orig. polinesiana] s. m. inv. tatuaggio …   Sinonimi e Contrari. Terza edizione

  • tattoo — tattoo1 [ta to͞o′] vt. tattooed, tattooing [< a Polynesian language < Proto Polynesian * tatau] 1. to puncture (the skin) with a needle and insert indelible colors so as to leave permanent marks or designs 2. to make (marks or designs) on… …   English World dictionary

  • TATTOO — (Heb. ketovet ka ka), a sign made by puncturing the skin and inserting pigment. A mark of slavery or of submission to a deity (Isa. 44:5, although tattooing is not explicitly mentioned) in the ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome, tattooing is… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Tattoo — For other uses, see Tattoo (disambiguation). A tattooed woman in the United States, ca. 1907. A tattoo is made by inserting indelible ink into the dermis layer of the skin to change the pigment. Tattoos on humans are a type of body modification,… …   Wikipedia

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