alveolarization


alveolarization
al·ve·o·la·ri·za·tion (al-ve-o″lə-rĭ-zaґshən) the formation of new pulmonary alveoli; most occurs in the fetus or infant, but some occurs throughout life.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

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