codeine


codeine
Obtained from opium, which contains 0.7 to 2.5%, but usually made from morphine. Used as an analgesic and antitussive; drug dependence (physical and psychic) may develop, but c. is less liable to produce addiction than is morphine; c. is biotransformed to morphine, which accounts for most of c.'s effects. SYN: methylmorphine. [G. kodeia, head, poppy head]

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co·deine 'kō-.dēn, 'kōd-ē-ən n a morphine derivative that is found in opium, is weaker in action than morphine, and is used esp. in the form of its sulfate (C18H21NO3)2·H2SO4 or phosphate C18H21NO3·H3PO4 esp. as an analgesic and an antitussive

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n.
an analgesic derived from morphine but less potent as a pain killer and sedative and less toxic. It is administered by mouth or injection to relieve pain and also to suppress coughs. Common side-effects include constipation, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and drowsiness, but dependence is uncommon.

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co·deine (koґdēn) [L. codeina] [USP] a narcotic alkaloid obtained from opium or prepared by methylating morphine. Called also methylmorphine.

Medical dictionary. 2011.