contracture
Static muscle shortening due to tonic spasm or fibrosis, to loss of muscular balance, the antagonists being paralyzed or to a loss of motion of the adjacent joint. [L. contractura, fr. con-traho, to draw together]
- Dupuytren c. a disease of the palmar fascia resulting in thickening and shortening of fibrous bands on the palmar surface of the hand and fingers resulting in a characteristic flexion deformity of the fourth and fifth digits.
- fixed c. SYN: organic c..
- functional c. muscular shortening that ceases during sleep or general anesthesia, caused by prolonged active muscle contraction.
- ischemic c. of the left ventricle irreversible contraction of the left ventricle of the heart, seen as a complication in the early period of cardiopulmonary bypass and now avoided by appropriate cardioplegic solutions. SYN: myocardial rigor mortis, stone heart.
- organic c. c., usually due to fibrosis within the muscle that persists whether the subject is conscious or unconscious. SYN: fixed c..
- Volkmann c. ischemic c. resulting from irreversible necrosis of muscle tissue, produced by a compartment syndrome; classically involves the forearm flexor muscles.

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con·trac·ture kən-'trak-chər n a permanent shortening (as of muscle, tendon, or scar tissue) producing deformity or distortion see DUPUYTREN'S CONTRACTURE

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n.
fibrosis of skeletal muscle or connective tissue producing shortening and resulting in deformity of a joint. See also Dupuytren's contracture, Volkmann's contracture.

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con·trac·ture (kən-trakґchər) [L. contractura] a condition of fixed high resistance to passive stretch of a muscle, resulting from fibrosis of the tissues supporting the muscles or the joints, or from disorders of the muscle fibers.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • contracture — [ kɔ̃traktyr ] n. f. • 1676; « contraction » 1611; lat. contractura 1 ♦ Archit. Rétrécissement de la partie supérieure d une colonne. 2 ♦ (1808) Méd. Contraction prolongée et involontaire d un ou plusieurs muscles. ⇒ crampe, spasme, tétanie.… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • contracture — 1650s, from Fr. contracture, from L. contractura a drawing together, from contractus, pp. of contrahere (see CONTRACT (Cf. contract)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • Contracture — Con*trac ture (?; 135), n. [L. contractura a drawing together.] (Med.) A state of permanent rigidity or contraction of the muscles, generally of the flexor muscles. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • contracture — CONTRACTURE. subst. f. Terme d Architecture. Rétrécissement qui se fait dans la partie supérieure d une colonne …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • contracture — [kən trak′chər] n. a condition of abnormal shortening or shrinkage of a muscle, tendon, etc., often with persistent flexion or distortion at a joint …   English World dictionary

  • Contracture — This article refers to orthopedic contractures; for other types of contractures see the See Also section below. Contracture Classification and external resources ICD 10 M24.5, M62.4, M67.1, M72.0, T …   Wikipedia

  • Contracture — Une contracture, terme utilisé le plus souvent dans le milieu sportif, est une contraction musculaire involontaire d un certain nombre de fibres musculaires au sein d un même muscle ou d un groupe musculaire, d une durée inhabituellement longue,… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • contracture — n. fibrosis of skeletal muscle or connective tissue producing shortening and resulting in deformity of a joint. See also: Dupuytren s contracture, Volkmann s contracture …   The new mediacal dictionary

  • contracture — noun Date: 1658 a permanent shortening (as of muscle, tendon, or scar tissue) producing deformity or distortion …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • CONTRACTURE — s. f. Il se dit, en Architecture, d Un rétrécissement qui se fait dans la partie supérieure d une colonne.  Il se dit, en Médecine, d Une maladie qui consiste dans la rigidité plus ou moins considérable et prolongée des muscles …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 7eme edition (1835)

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