Cytoplasm


Cytoplasm
All of the substance of a cell outside of the nucleus. The cytoplasm contains a number of different types organelles such as the mitochondria. Most, but not all, cells have cytoplasm. Mature sperm are essentially devoid of cytoplasm. The word "cytoplasm" was compounded from two Greek roots — "kytos," a hollow vessel + "plasma," plasm. From "kytos" came the prefix "cyto-," cell. Cytoplasm is literally cell plasm.
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The substance of a cell, exclusive of the nucleus, which contains various organelles and inclusions within a colloidal protoplasm. SEE ALSO: protoplasm, hyaloplasm, cytosol. [cyto- + G. plasma, thing formed]
- ground-glass c. uniform finely granular eosinophilic c. seen in hepatocytes in carriers of hepatitis B virus, and also in epidermal cells in keratoacanthoma.

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cy·to·plasm 'sīt-ə-.plaz-əm n the organized complex of inorganic and organic substances external to the nuclear membrane of a cell and including the cytosol and membrane-bound organelles (as mitochondria or chloroplasts)
cy·to·plas·mic .sīt-ə-'plaz-mik adj
cy·to·plas·mi·cal·ly -mi-k(ə-)lē adv

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n.
the jelly-like substance that surrounds the nucleus of a cell. See also ectoplasm, endoplasm, protoplasm.
cytoplasmic adj.

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cy·to·plasm (siґto-plaz″əm) [cyto- + -plasm] the protoplasm of a cell exclusive of that of the nucleus; it consists of a continuous aqueous solution (cytosol) and the organelles and inclusions suspended in it and is the site of most of the chemical activities of the cell. Cf. nucleoplasm. cytoplasmic adj

Medical dictionary. 2011.