glycerol


glycerol
A sweet viscous fluid obtained by the saponification of fats and fixed oils; used as a solvent, as a skin emollient, by injection or in the form of suppository for constipation, and as a vehicle and sweetening agent. SYN: 1,2,3-propanetriol, glycerin, glycerite (1), glyceryl alcohol.
- iodinated g. a form of organically bound iodine which liberates iodine systemically. Has been used as a medicinal source of iodine and as an expectorant in place of inorganic iodides such as potassium iodide. SYN: iodopropylidene g., organidin.
- g. kinase an enzyme that catalyzes a reaction between ATP and g. to yield sn-g. 3-phosphate and ADP; in adipose tissue, the first and rate-limiting step in the synthesis of triacylglycerols; deficiency results in the disruption of adrenal, muscle, and/or liver and brain function. SYN: glycerokinase.
- g. phosphate the anion of a phosphoric ester of g.; the 3-derivative is the central component of phosphatidates (R-g. 3-phosphate). SYN: glycerophosphate.

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glyc·er·ol 'glis-ə-.rȯl, -.rōl n a sweet syrupy hygroscopic trihydroxy alcohol C3H8O3 usu. obtained by the saponification of fats and used esp. as a solvent and plasticizer, as a moistening agent, emollient, and lubricant, and as an emulsifying agent called also glycerin

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glyc·er·ol (glisґər-ol) a trihydroxy sugar alcohol that is the backbone of many lipids and an important intermediate in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Pharmaceutical preparations are called glycerin (q.v.).

Medical dictionary. 2011.