pedicle


pedicle
1. A constricted portion or stalk. SYN: pediculus (1) [TA]. 2. A stalk by which a nonsessile tumor is attached to normal tissue. SYN: pedunculus [TA], peduncle (2). 3. A stalk through which a flap of tissue is vascularized, permitting transfer to another site. [L. pediculus, dim. of pes, foot]
- p. of arch of vertebra [TA] the constricted portion of the arch on either side extending from the body to the lamina; bound intervertebral foramina superiorly and inferiorly. SYN: pediculus arcus vertebrae [TA], radix arcus vertebrae.
- vascular p. the tissues containing arteries and veins of an organ; specifically in chest radiology, the (width of the) mediastinum at the level of the aortic arch and superior vena cava.

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ped·i·cle 'ped-i-kəl n a basal attachment: as
a) the basal part of each side of the neural arch of a vertebra connecting the laminae with the centrum
b) the narrow basal part by which various organs (as kidney or spleen) are continuous with other body structures
c) the narrow base of a tumor
d) the part of a pedicle flap left attached to the original site

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n.
1. the narrow neck of tissue connecting some tumours to the normal tissue from which they have developed.
2. (in plastic surgery) a narrow folded tube of skin by means of which a piece of skin used for grafting remains attached to its original site. A pedicle graft is used when the recipient site is unsuited to take an independent skin graft (for example, because of poor blood supply). See also flap, skin graft.
3. (in anatomy) any slender stemlike process.

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ped·i·cle (pedґĭ-kəl) [L. pediculus little foot] a footlike, stemlike, or narrow basal part or structure, as the stalk by which a nonsessile tumor is attached to normal tissue, or the narrow strip of flap tissue through which it receives its blood supply. Called also pediculus.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Pedicle — or pedicel may refer to: * Pedicle (anatomy), the segment between the transverse process and the vertebral body, and is often used as a radiographic marker and entry point in vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty procedures *Pedicle (zoology), a fleshy… …   Wikipedia

  • Pedicle — Ped i*cle, n. [L. pediculus a little foot, dim. of pes foot: cf. F. p[ e]dicule. See {edal}, and cf. {Pedicel}.] Same as {Pedicel}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pedicle — 1620s, from L. pediculus “footstalk,” dim. of pedem (nom. pes) “foot” (see FOOT (Cf. foot)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • pedicle — [ped′i kəl] n. [L pediculus] PEDICEL …   English World dictionary

  • pedicle — n. 1) the narrow neck of tissue connecting some tumours to the normal tissue from which they have developed. 2) (in plastic surgery) a narrow folded tube of skin by means of which a piece of skin used for grafting remains attached to its original …   The new mediacal dictionary

  • pedicle — noun Etymology: Latin pediculus, from diminutive of ped , pes Date: 1626 1. pedicel b 2. the part of a skin or tissue graft left attached to the original site during the preliminary stages of union • pedicled adjective …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • pedicle — pedicel …   Dictionary of ichthyology

  • pedicle — n. [L. pediculus, little foot] (BRACHIOPODA) A variously developed, tough flexible stalk protruding from the bivalve shell; functioning as a tether, a pivot around which the shell may be moved, or as a locomotory organ …   Dictionary of invertebrate zoology

  • pedicle — /ped i keuhl/, n. Zool. a small stalk or stalklike support, as the connection between the cephalothorax and abdomen in certain arachnids. [1555 65; < L pediculus, dim. of pes (s. ped ) FOOT. See PEDI , CLE1] * * * …   Universalium

  • pedicle — noun /ˈpɛdɪkəl/ a) A fleshy line used to attach and anchor brachiopods and some bivalve molluscs to a substrate. b) The attachment point for antlers in cervids …   Wiktionary


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