wound


wound
1. Trauma to any of the tissues of the body, especially that caused by physical means and with interruption of continuity. 2. A surgical incision. [O.E. wund]
- abraded w. SYN: abrasion (1).
- avulsed w. a w. caused by or resulting from avulsion.
- crease w. SYN: gutter w..
- glancing w. SYN: gutter w..
- gunshot w. a w. made with a bullet or other missile projected by a firearm.
- gutter w. a tangential w. that makes a furrow without perforating the skin. SYN: crease w., glancing w..
- incised w. a clean cut, as by a sharp instrument.
- nonpenetrating w. injury, especially within the thorax or abdomen, produced without disruption of the surface of the body.
- open w. a w. in which the tissues are exposed to the air.
- penetrating w. a w. with disruption of the body surface that extends into underlying tissue or into a body cavity.
- perforating w. a w. with an entrance and exit opening.
- puncture w. a w. in which the opening is relatively small as compared to the depth, as produced by a narrow pointed object.
- septic w. a w. that has become infected.
- seton w. a tangential perforating w., the entrance and exit openings being on the same side of the body, head, or limb involved.
- stab w. a puncture w. produced by the stabbing motion of a knife or similar object.
- subcutaneous w. an injury or w. extending below the skin into the subcutaneous tissue, but not affecting underlying bones or organs.
- sucking chest w. SYN: open pneumothorax.
- tangential w. a perforating w. or seton w. that involves only one side of the part.

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wound 'wünd n
1 a) a physical injury to the body consisting of a laceration or breaking of the skin or mucous membrane <has a deep festering knife \wound across the palm> <a gunshot \wound>
b) an opening made in the skin or a membrane of the body incidental to a surgical operation or procedure
2) a mental or emotional hurt or blow
wound vt to cause a wound to or in

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n.
a break in the structure of an organ or tissue caused by an external agent. Bruises, grazes, tears, cuts, punctures, and burns are all examples of wounds.

* * *

(wnd) [L. vulnus] an injury or damage, usually restricted to those caused by physical means with disruption of normal continuity of structures. Called also injury and trauma.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

Synonyms:
, (for example, a cut, stab, bruise, etc.), , , , (with some weapon or such agency) / , , , , , , , , , / (of the mind or feelings), , , , , , , , , ,


Look at other dictionaries:

  • wound — n Wound, trauma, traumatism, lesion, bruise, contusion are comparable when they mean an injury to one of the organs or parts of the body. Wound generally denotes an injury that is inflicted by a hard or sharp instrument (as a knife, a bullet, or… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Wound — Wound, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Wounded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Wounding}.] [AS. wundian. [root]140. See {Wound}, n.] [1913 Webster] 1. To hurt by violence; to produce a breach, or separation of parts, in, as by a cut, stab, blow, or the like. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wound — wound1 [wo͞ond] n. [ME wunde < OE wund, akin to Ger wunde < IE * wen , var. of base * wā , to hit, wound > WEN1] 1. an injury to the body in which the skin or other tissue is broken, cut, pierced, torn, etc. 2. an injury to a plant… …   English World dictionary

  • Wound — (?; 277), n. [OE. wounde, wunde, AS. wund; akin to OFries. wunde, OS. wunda, D. wonde, OHG. wunta, G. wunde, Icel. und, and to AS., OS., & G. wund sore, wounded, OHG. wunt, Goth. wunds, and perhaps also to Goth. winnan to suffer, E. win.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wound — [n] injury anguish, bruise, cut, damage, distress, gash, grief, harm, heartbreak, hurt, insult, laceration, lesion, pain, pang, shock, slash, torment, torture, trauma; concept 309 wound [v1] cause bodily damage bruise, carve, clip*, contuse, cut …   New thesaurus

  • wound´ed|ly — wound|ed «WOON dihd», adjective, noun. –adj. 1. suffering from a wound or wounds: »Kay near him groaning like a wounded bull (Tennyson). 2. Figurative. deeply pained or grieved: »The quiet of my wounded conscience (Shakespeare). –n. the wounded,… …   Useful english dictionary

  • wound|ed — «WOON dihd», adjective, noun. –adj. 1. suffering from a wound or wounds: »Kay near him groaning like a wounded bull (Tennyson). 2. Figurative. deeply pained or grieved: »The quiet of my wounded conscience (Shakespeare). –n. the wounded, those who …   Useful english dictionary

  • wound´i ly — wound|y «WOON dee», adjective. Especially British Dialect. very great; extreme; excessive. ╂[< (God s) wound(s), an oath, swounds + y1] –wound´i ly, adverb …   Useful english dictionary

  • wound|y — «WOON dee», adjective. Especially British Dialect. very great; extreme; excessive. ╂[< (God s) wound(s), an oath, swounds + y1] –wound´i ly, adverb …   Useful english dictionary

  • Wound — Wound, imp. & p. p. of {Wind} to twist, and {Wind} to sound by blowing. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wound up — [ˌwaund ˈʌp] adj [not before noun] anxious, worried, or excited ▪ I was too wound up to sleep …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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