Acetone


Acetone
In the body, a chemical that is formed when the body uses fat instead of glucose (sugar) for energy. The formation of acetone means that cells lack insulin or cannot effectively use available insulin to burn glucose for energy. Acetone passes through the body into the urine as one of the so-called ketone bodies. Acetone is highly volatile. The breath of someone with a great deal of acetone in the body smells fruity and is called "acetone breath."
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A colorless, volatile, flammable liquid; extremely small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in urine and blood of diabetic persons, sometimes imparting an ethereal odor to the urine and breath. It is one of the ketone bodies. The synthetic is used as a solvent in some pharmaceutical and commercial preparations. SYN: dimethyl ketone.

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ac·e·tone 'as-ə-.tōn n a volatile fragrant flammable liquid ketone C3H6O used chiefly as a solvent and in organic synthesis and found in abnormal quantities in diabetic urine called also propanone
ac·e·ton·ic .as-ə-'tän-ik adj

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n.
an organic compound that is an intermediate in many bacterial fermentations and is produced by fatty acid oxidation. In certain abnormal conditions (for example, starvation) acetone and other ketone may accumulate in the blood (see ketosis). Acetone is a volatile liquid that is miscible with both fats and water and therefore of great value as a solvent. It is used in chromatography and in the preparation of tissues for enzyme extraction.

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ac·e·tone (asґə-tōn) 1. dimethylketone, a flammable colorless, volatile liquid with a pleasant ethereal odor; it is a commonly used solvent and is one of the ketone bodies (q.v.) produced in ketoacidosis. 2. [NF] a preparation of acetone used as a solvent and as an antiseptic.

Medical dictionary. 2011.