Vomit


Vomit
Matter from the stomach that has come up into and may be ejected beyond the mouth, due to the act of vomiting. When vomit is reddish or the color of coffee grounds, it may mean there is serious internal bleeding. The reddish color may herald fresh blood and dark blood may betoken blood that has been digested. Vomit and vomitus are synonymous. The act of vomiting is also called emesis.
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1. To eject matter from the stomach through the mouth. 2. Vomitus; the matter so ejected. SYN: vomitus (2). [L. vomo, pp. vomitus, to v.]
- Barcoo v. attacks of nausea and vomiting accompanied by bulimia affecting those living in the interior of the southern part of Australia.
- bilious v. v. containing large amounts of bile suggestive of bowel obstruction distal to the papilla of Vater.
- black v. the coffee-ground-colored material that is vomited, specifically, in severe yellow fever. SEE ALSO: coffee-ground v.. SYN: vomitus niger.
- coffee-ground v. v. consisting of fresh or old blood. SEE ALSO: black v..

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vom·it 'väm-ət n
1) VOMITING
2) stomach contents disgorged through the mouth called also vomitus
vomit vi to disgorge the stomach contents vt to disgorge (the contents of the stomach) through the mouth

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1. vb. to eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth (see vomiting).
2. n. the contents of the stomach ejected during vomiting. Medical name: vomitus.

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vom·it (vomґit) [L. vomitare] 1. to cast up from the stomach by the mouth. 2. matter cast up from the stomach; vomited matter.

Medical dictionary. 2011.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • vomit — vomit …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • Vomit — Vom it, n. [L. vomitus, from vomere, vomitum, to vomit; akin to Gr. ?, Skr. vam, Lith. vemiti. Cf. {Emetic}, {Vomito}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Matter that is vomited; esp., matter ejected from the stomach through the mouth. [1913 Webster] Like vomit… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • vomit — (n.) late 14c., act of expelling contents of the stomach through the mouth, from L. vomitare to vomit often, frequentative of vomere spew forth, discharge, from PIE root *wem to spit, vomit (Cf. Gk. emein to vomit, emetikos provoking sickness;… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Vomit — Vom it, v. t. 1. To throw up; to eject from the stomach through the mouth; to disgorge; to puke; to spew out; often followed by up or out. [1913 Webster] The fish . . . vomited out Jonah upon the dry land. Jonah ii. 10. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • vomit — [väm′it] n. [ME < L vomitus, a discharging, vomiting < pp. of vomere, to discharge, vomit < IE base * wemē > Gr emein, to vomit, OE wamm, stain, disgrace] 1. the act or process of ejecting the contents of the stomach through the mouth …   English World dictionary

  • Vomit — Vom it, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Vomited}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Vomiting}.] [Cf. L. vomere, vomitum, and v. freq. vomitare. See {Vomit}, n.] To eject the contents of the stomach by the mouth; to puke; to spew. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • vomit — ► VERB (vomited, vomiting) 1) eject matter from the stomach through the mouth. 2) emit in an uncontrolled stream or flow. ► NOUN ▪ matter vomited from the stomach. ORIGIN Latin vomere to vomit …   English terms dictionary

  • vomit — *belch, burp, disgorge, regurgitate, spew, throw up Analogous words: *eject, expel, oust …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • vomit — The verb has inflected forms vomited, vomiting …   Modern English usage

  • vomit — [v] disgorge be seasick*, be sick, bring up*, dry heave*, eject, emit, expel, gag*, heave*, hurl*, puke*, regurgitate, retch, ruminate, spew, spit up, throw up, upchuck*; concepts 179,185,308 …   New thesaurus

  • vomit — 01. He got seasick, and began to [vomit] after half an hour on the boat. 02. I [vomited] a couple of times last night because I drank too much. 03. He got really drunk at the party, and ended up outside, [vomiting] in the garden. 04. The most… …   Grammatical examples in English


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